Human Rights: The ASEAN Dilemma

The microcosm of the problematic interface of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights with the value systems of individual Muslim-majority members of that organization is being played out among ASEAN states, which is becoming an economic entity of some importance in the modern world. Continue reading

Western Human Rights and Freedom

At the recent Universal Periodic Review (UPR) session held in Geneva on 24th October 2013, it was clear that many Western countries were pressuring Malaysia to sign and ratify certain international human rights treaties; including the ones that allow for unbridled freedom of religion (such as Article 18 of ICCPR on freedom of religion). There were also calls from at least 5 countries for Malaysia to abolish her anti-sodomy laws (section 377A of the Penal Code and the various Shariah enactments); this eventually for allowing same-sex marriage. Indeed, Western countries are willing to go to the extent of overriding the sovereignty of nations in propagating ‘universal standards’ of human rights achievements.

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COMANGO’s retrograde agenda

COMANGO is a coalition of Malaysian NGOs purporting to represent the secular human rights groups, as well as “intelligent” liberal Muslim point-of-view. MuslimUPRo‘s objection to COMANGO’s retrograde agenda can be seen in MuslimUPRo’s earlier memorandum to the Government as well as media statements and other writings. Continue reading

The new ‘human rights-ism’

Anthony Julius, a Manchester Guardian columnist makes the following comment in his article “Human Rights: the new secular religion:

“This new ‘human rights-ism’ accords great value to the United Nations – notwithstanding its inability to enforce its decisions, and its refusal to make practical demands of its members to be democratic or respect the human rights of their citizens.”

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COMANGO’s siege mentality

It is now less than 8 hours before Malaysia goes under review of her human rights record in the UPR process at the Human Rights Council, Geneva.

I have read an article by Honey Tan of COMANGO’s secretariat (here’s the full link) and, as has happened before, was initially impressed with her commendable writing skills. Then, as has also happened before, I watched her unravel a bit as she descended into ‘emotional’ remarks.

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Why and By Whom is Marriage being Redefined?

Young adult men’s support for redefining marriage may not be entirely the product of ideals about expansive freedoms, rights, liberties, and fairness. It may be, in part, a by-product of regular exposure to diverse and graphic sex acts.” The scholarly studies that have produced this statement are reported here. This is important research in the Social Sciences that needs to be brought to the attention of the United Nations Human Rights Council and the proponents of the 2006 Yogyakarta Principles, which tend to assume that their infamous “Human Rights” fully supports gay rights and pro-choice reproductive freedoms (in other words, free abortion). Continue reading

UDHR and the position of Islam in Malaysia’s Federal Constitution

This paper examines the issue of the relationship between the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Malaysian Federal Constitution. Article 3(1) of the Federal Constitution specially singles out Islam as the religion of the Federation of Malaysia. This provision therefore, prima facie, conflicts with the provisions of the UDHR which require that people are not discriminated against on the basis of, among other grounds such as religion.

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Islamic NGOs To Submit Proposals Concerning Human Rights To Government

Originally reported here.

KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 5 (Bernama) — Over 20 Islamic non-governmental organisations (NGOs) will submit several proposals to the government concerning human rights issues that can threaten the sovereignty of Islam in Malaysia for the universal periodic review (UPR) purposes.

Malaysian Muslim Lawyers Association vice-president Azril Mohd Amin said the UPR would give the opportunity to the ruling government in 192 countries, including Malaysia, to declare the actions that could improve human rights in their respective countries.

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